The investigation continues in the incidence of botulism, which killed up to 20 cattle on the farm Kildare

  • The investigation continues in the incidence of botulism, which killed up to 20 cattle on the farm Kildare
    FarmIreland.t. E.
    “In the investigation of” a possible connection between poultry and suspected incidence of botulism as the cause of sudden death up to 20 beef cattle on a farm in County Kildare last spring has been confirmed by the Department of agriculture and food.
    https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/news/farming-news/investigation-ongoing-into-botulism-incidence-which-caused-the-death-of-up-to-20-cattle-on-kildare-farm-37196301.html
    https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/news/farming-news/article37060577.ece/ffc2b/AUTOCROP/h342/Farming%20injecting%20his%20sick%20cow%20with%20vaccine.jpg

  • Email

“In the investigation of” a possible connection between poultry and suspected incidence of botulism as the cause of sudden death up to 20 beef cattle on a farm in County Kildare last spring has been confirmed by the Department of agriculture and food.

However, six months after the incident, which involved the loss of the farmer to 30 000 euros, Minister Michael creed said in response to Dale that the investigation was “not yet concluded” and continues.

The Minister told Deputy Timmy Dooley, who raised the issue in parliamentary question that the investigation suggests that “adequate measures are being taken to prevent outbreaks (botulism) on the farm where poultry is spreading; the bird droppings of the carrier; and poultry units, which supplied poultry litter”.

The Minister added: “my Department is fully aware of the incident botulism, mentioned in the question. Currently, a thorough investigation is ongoing and not yet completed. It would therefore be inappropriate to comment further on this matter at this stage”.

Creed, the Minister noted that there are strict codes of good practice that should be observed in poultry, poultry carriers and the end user of the poultry industry in respect of management, handling and use of poultry in order to minimize the risk of contamination of the pastures, so the cattle to the end consumer of the farm and from neighbouring farms.

In addition, it is expected that officials from the Ministry of agriculture inspected the farm in County Meath, where botulism is also suspected as causes of sudden death of the ten feed earlier this year.

Other reported losses of animals suspected of having been caused by botulism in recent months, remain unconfirmed. There is no legal requirement for veterinarians to notify the Department of agriculture from patients with suspected Botulism in this country, although they are not recommended to do so. It is a legal requirement to report such cases in England.

Botulism, which is commonly associated with poultry, is the ranking of the most deadliest toxin in the world, so fatally, that “sniffing 13-billionths of a gram can be fatal”, and once in the body of the animal is fatal within a few hours, without remedy.

Pat McCormack, the President of ICMSA, said agriculture independent that any suspect Botulism infection is “very concerning” for livestock.

“There is simply no room for complacency and the farmers expected a clear and definite conclusion about what happened (on these farms) and how any repetition can be avoided of the Department of agriculture and food,” he added.

Online Business Classes