The artist makes Irish fashionable in t-shirts and greeting cards

  • The artist makes Irish fashionable in t-shirts and greeting cards
    Independent.t. E.
    When the Prime Minister of Ireland ENDA Kenny visited the White house in March 2017 for the annual St. Patrick’s day celebration, he not only presented the traditional bowl of Shamrock is the name of the President of the United States Donald trump, but brought Irish gifts for his wife, Melania and couples only son Barron.
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When the Prime Minister of Ireland ENDA Kenny visited the White house in March 2017 for the annual St. Patrick’s day celebration, he not only presented the traditional bowl of Shamrock is the name of the President of the United States Donald trump, but brought Irish gifts for his wife, Melania and couples only son Barron.

Among the haul presented by Kenny, who, as we know, pointed to what turned out to be a viral speech that “St. Patrick was the patron Saint of immigrants”, was the Moon revolved:. B. Yates for children.

Collection of Yeats poetry and folk tales were illustrated by Shirley, Shauna MacDonald, a Scottish artist who moved to Ireland ten years ago. Indeed, Irish folklore and language and the meaning of existence for Mireog, the design company, it works.

Illustrator to set Mireog in the Studio in the home she shares in co Waterford person of the Rinn with a partner Ciaran O Nuallain, a 36-year-old artist, print-maker and art teacher, who also designs t-shirts they produce. The pair met when they were both studying at Edinburgh College of art.

Sean Mireog founded in 2014, realizing that there was a gap in the market for ECO-illustrated greeting cards, stationery, t-shirts and posters, all emblazoned with Proverbs, songs and folklore in Ireland and other Celtic languages. Front of t-shirt Mireog, for example, there are six such Proverbs in each of the Celtic languages, which are arranged in a spiral fashion. The Irish version of the saying: “TIR Gan teanga, TIR Gan Anam” which means “a country without language is a country without a soul.”

Sean (32) grew up in Aberdeenshire, with his father, whose first language was Gaelic. However, it is rarely heard that he told her, and she was mostly indifferent to the Celtic languages, until she met Kieran, fluent Irish speaker from Carlow. In the 2011 census showed only 1.1 PC of the Scottish population can speak Gaelic.

“My father was Scottish Gaelic, but never spoke he to us, so I don’t have a positive attitude to it,” says Sean. “People don’t learn it at school, although there are a few Gaelic schools and some schools teach it as a subject. So before I met Kieran, I found the Celtic languages are interesting. He is the mastermind Mireog”.

After moving to Ireland, Sean lived in Carlow and cork. But six years ago, she and Kieran moved to Rinn. Being immersed in the Irish-speaking environment inspired Sean to create illustrations and design that will promote the language.“I wanted to help the language, and I don’t think there are many products available like ours,” she says. “I started learning Irish, going to school and tells Ciaran through the Irish a bit. I am the Manager Mireog. But Kieran is a good speaker, he promotes Mireog through the Irish.”

To establish Mireog, which means “to frolic” in Ireland, Shauna dipped her finger in the business, selling a small number of cards through etsy, small Internet market. “I didn’t sell much because it is such a huge site,” she says. “But I worked on the project for two years to create Mireog in 2014.”

During his market research when she made those cards for the Irish and English languages, the artist realized that the Irish version was more popular. This gave Sean the confidence to approach retailers about the supply of products. “I emailed the bookshop Charlie Byrne [in Galway] because I liked it so much in the store, and they replied and ordered a bunch of cards,” she says. “They had great support so far.”

T-shirt Mireog, meanwhile, manual screen printing ink, water-based couple in their Studio. It is important that their materials have a minimum impact on the environment — not only did not come in plastic packaging, but uses Mireog 100pcs organic cotton t-shirts, which are produced in the Land of positivity in India at the factory using wind and solar energy.

Sean has also been proposed to use earth positive, because the company is affiliated with the fair wear Foundation, a nonprofit organization that audits them, so they don’t stick together, child or forced labour or trade in unsafe conditions.

“In 2013 there were the collapse of the building of garment in Bangladesh, which killed 1,134 people, which occurred due to the negligence of the owners of the building. This is not an isolated case and, unfortunately, since then little has changed,” says Sean, who plans to increase the resistance of the materials Mireog on.

Because Mireog was created, the burgeoning business sells its goods at festivals. He began to sell his Celtic proverb t-shirt at the Celtic festival in Carlow and took participated in the festival of the West Waterford food.

“Pan Celtic were in Carlow a few times and is a festival of food, music, writing, dancing and singing competitions,” says Sean. “When we did our first market for this, Wales and Scotland choirs were on both ends of the pub singing.”

In 2017, Mireog made his debut appearance on house, annual exhibition at the RDS, which emphasizes the Irish art and design for international trade buyers seeking new suppliers. Mireog was one of the six participants made in Waterford stand, with the support of the local branch of the enterprise. Companies use the exhibition as an opportunity to sell their Irish language range of notebooks that are made in Ireland from recycled paper and cardboard.

“Being on display was the best we could do because when stockists are open to receiving new products,” says Sean. Products Mireog now selling in 30 locations throughout the island. The range of shops includes the cat and the Moon applied art and jewelry store in Sligo, florist in Dungarvan, Bastion Gallery in Athlone, Ireland winding stair restaurant in Dublin, and Siopa.t. E., the online store for Irish products.

“Online, we sell about a third of our products to Ireland, the third in the UK and third in the United States,” says Sean. “There are also clients in several other countries, such as Scandinavia, where some people either speak Irish or have a bias towards language.”

Sale 260pc Mireog rose in the year to date, and Sean believes that the international demand for online shop shows there is a market for the company’s products in physical retail outlets in the US and the UK.

Not bad for a company led by two artists who have no business experience. “We are discussing it and learning as we go along,” says Sean. “There were many problems, as it is a very time consuming process, and there are only two of us, so we have to do all the work ourselves and wear different hats.”

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