Steve Dempsey: pop-UPS prices for online privacy

  • Steve Dempsey: pop-UPS prices for online privacy
    Independent.t. E.
    General data protection regulation in Europe, or GDPR should provide users with transparency and control over their data. But this control comes at a cost: and that cost thousands of pop-UPS. Nowhere is this more evident than news sites that rely on online advertising for their revenues.
    https://www.independent.ie/business/media/steve-dempsey-popups-are-price-of-online-privacy-37207146.html
    https://www.independent.ie/business/article37207145.ece/c93cd/AUTOCROP/h342/2018-08-12_bus_43151150_I1.JPG

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General data protection regulation in Europe, or GDPR should provide users with transparency and control over their data. But this control comes at a cost: and that cost thousands of pop-UPS. Nowhere is this more evident than news sites that rely on online advertising for their revenues.

Some of these pop-UPS are not Intrusive, demanding attention and user’s consent to the transfer of data for personalized advertising. Many use a ready-made solution from a similar audience using several different technical a company that specializiruetsya on AI and real-time data – powered advertising- and who seems to have used GDPR to play gamekeeper and poacher.

More pop-up Windows are small and easily ignored. They mention privacy and cookie settings and noted that users consent to data exchange will be determined if the user clicks Ok or click on any of the content on the website.

Some links to pages that described in detail all the ad vendors they work with, allowing users to choose those with whom they will share their information. Seriously, who is going to read these lists, and the selection of suppliers of advertising technologies, they are happy to share personal information? Criteo AppNexus or what you prefer?

One thing is clear: there’s no consistency for consumers. The European legislator has left to the discretion of businesses which operate online, to develop technologies and equipment which includes privacy by design. But the establishment of the requirements of these consent to all EU citizens without a control system they thought that the EU went with a currency Union without a banking Union.

We all know how it works.

Internet advertising is probably too complicated and threatened to create a structure that protects user data and continues to support the observation of capitalism.

But he tried. In the interactive advertising Bureau (iab) is the industry body that supports online advertising industry.

He proposed a complicated system which allows publishers to capture user consent on behalf of advertisers and store the consent in the centre. This is complicated by the nature of programmatic Advertising; bids may come in from the owner of an advertising exchange in real-time with a constantly changing set of ad exchanges.

But MAB framework has some problems. First, there is every chance that it will do little more than protect the status quo of muddy programmatic advertising ecosystem, in which behavioral-ads are sold for a pittance. But much bigger problem is the fact that the largest ad provider is not on Board. Who am I saying? Google, of course. The search giant promises that it will integrate with the ATS framework.

Google is also playing hardball with publishers that use its advertising ecosystem, insisting that they take responsibility as controllers of the data collected and advertisers.

However, he softened his cough in relation to their own platform management agreement, the financing of elections. Publishers using this platform was only allowed to collect consent for up to 12 suppliers advertising technologies. Google, this restriction was removed after a complaint from the publishers.

Position Google are some practical questions on GDPR and advertising. Big guys can throw your weight around and dictate terms to small children. Unfortunately, less in this case means news companies.

But some publishers have been able to ignore the GDPR. How? Being abroad. Hundreds of American news sites took one look at the GDPR, shrugged, and turned away from their European viewers.

Try to read the story of the Los Angeles times and you will get the following message: “sorry, currently our site is unavailable in most European countries. We are engaged on this issue and will help to look at the choices that support our full range of digital services to the EU market”. Today’s visit to the US, and you will get the experience of the EU.

It is a simplified version of the website that do not collect personal information and looks very rare. Ironically, the site does need to collect some personal information in order to determine whether the reader into the EU in the first place.

It is unlikely that a more insular Europe was part of the plan GDPR. Similarly, by investing more power in the hands of large technology companies, who control and monetize the data, probably unintentional.

The GDPR aims are commendable and should be extended to users of all online services. But receiving an international advertising technology company, which many news organizations depend on, to take them may be harder than legislators originally anticipated.

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