Opinion: politicians should address the shortcomings in the policy of high farm expansion risk

  • Opinion: politicians should address the shortcomings in the policy of high farm expansion risk
    FarmIreland.t. E.
    We are certainly not out of the woods yet with the weather and the supply of different sectors of agricultural production must now strive to help each other is commendable. However, my first challenge is to sort out my own farm enterprise and get it back up and running again.
    https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/comment/opinion-politicians-must-tackle-the-flaws-in-high-risk-farm-expansion-policies-37190520.html
    https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/article36998537.ece/8a689/AUTOCROP/h342/2018-06-12_bus_41537770_I1.JPG

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We are certainly not out of the woods yet with the weather and the supply of different sectors of agricultural production must now strive to help each other is commendable. However, my first challenge is to sort out my own farm enterprise and get it back up and running again.

I remember an old Jesuit teacher once told me that I will never allow myself to become a victim of circumstances, so my main goal at the moment is to make a second cut of silage in before the end of summer and, hopefully, I have enough feed for my animals next winter.

There was some strange reaction to the current crisis. One that I found particularly unusual was the last sentence that the farmers who wisely choose not to indulge in questionable high input systems should have the cap basic payment is reduced and the funds redirected to subsidize apparently failed intensive production systems.

To me it seems similar to suggesting that in the famous Bible story of the 10 virgins who were invited to the wedding feast, there were five wise virgins who have taken precautions in case their lamps ran out of oil lamps, which were to be punished.

I hope our politicians realize that they, too, were much more aware of the extreme difficulties that may arise from their enthusiasm contributed to the high risk policy extension. Now they have to do an in-depth examination of the serious flaws that this year’s weather put in this policy.

Back to my farm, and as I said, my first task was to evaluate how currently things are going and to make plans for the remainder of the year.

My livestock seem very happy and are doing amazingly well, but after such a disastrous spring and summer I’m still very concerned about how everything will eventually work out.

Fortunately, I managed to keep a good Internet aftergrass, which although not very good looking, will help you to get things in the right direction in the short and medium term.

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Garrigue McCullough: the agricultural lobby may be overestimating his influence as a hard quarter, and month emerges

Which way up or down for the quarter and month? The more I look into it, the harder it is to understand.

While the areas that received the suspension after receiving my first installation of silo looks better upon closer inspection, the slurry can still be seen on the ground. This is something I obviously have to watch very carefully over the next few weeks.

In relation to water supply, my local ‘Galtee scheme water is holding up well except for the temporary inconvenience caused by a major break about a mile from me. I am very grateful to the local crew Council, who quickly repaired the break and resumed feeding within a few hours.

I have sometimes referred to a pond in a high area and even if it is in a very elevated part of the farm, surprisingly she never went dry this summer. It was a huge comfort to me, because if worst came to worst I have a plan b in the form of a pond, to return.

The pond actually has quite historical roots. Some of my friends, who are interested in local history, called recently to see. They were able to tell me more about the local landowners James Scully, who met his death while shooting a duck on a dark November evening in the 1840-ies

Legend

Local legend has it that it was his brother, who apparently shot him for reasons of inheritance, but my friends believed that historical records indicate that it was probably some disgruntled tenants who are responsible for his murder. No one was charged for murder.

It’s not only the sights surrounding the pond and nearby is a complex of earthen mounds, including a well-preserved ring Fort, which dates from around 500-600AD.

What’s even more interesting is the presence of some bronze age earthenworks which indicate that people lived in the immediate vicinity of the pond for thousands of years.

Obviously, the water was as important to people who lived in the bronze age, as it is now.

It also makes me realize how brief and insignificant our stay in this world and how great our responsibility to hand on our world and environment in safety and security for future generations.

Unfortunately, this is something that our current capitalist system abmisibally not to do. This insatiable drive for exponential growth, which he prefers to ignore the limitedness of the natural resources of the Land on which our current economic model is totally dependent.

John Heney farms in Kilfeackle, County Tipperary

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